Celebrating 20 years of CSGO – Part 2

One article was just not enough to run through all the highlights of one of the oldest and most successful franchises. Here, we go even further down memory lane to see some earlier versions and changes to the game.

Arrival of CS: Source and Condition Zero

In November 2004, a new (and very different from the original) version was released. We welcomed CS: Source. This title had everything: a revamped physics engine, new gameplay mechanics, etc.

The ambiguously-received Condition Zero was also released in November. Fans expected this to be a superb title, as Source had proven so successful among the community. However, it was found to have a good single-player campaign while the multiplayer mode was full of bugs.

Asian conquest

In 2005, Counter-Strike Neo was released. This was an arcade version of the game that Valve developed for the Japanese market. This futuristic shooter was very different from the classic game. In July 2008, Valve made the decision to conquer the Asian market and entrusted the Korean company Nexon to develop its own version of CS. This is how Counter-Strike Online came into being. It was an adapted version of CS: Condition Zero for Korea, Japan, and China.

The color scheme was brighter, and the game itself was extremely arcade-like. Even in those days, everything was tied up with microtransactions: by paying real money, you could get a much stronger weapon.

CS: GO was inevitable

In 2009, a very unique game came out. A two-dimensional CS2D with a top view. Note that its first working prototype appeared in 2004, and it came out of beta in 2015. Valve had nothing to do with it. But it is interesting to know that the game was available on Steam without any problems.

August 2012 marked the beginning of the modern history of Counter-Strike, when we welcomed Global Offensive. The title was criticized by everyone in the early days, but now it is among the most successful FPS titles ever released. Molotov cocktails, different techniques for throwing grenades, and an impressive variety of rifles first appeared in the shooter.

Failed Zombies

In October 2014, we saw the release of a new game from Nexon/Valve – Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies. Of course, there was nothing in common between this game and classic CS, as it featured zombies, futuristic weapons, and some strange maps. Unlike CS Online, this game was released in the western market, but it failed to make a mark.

Modern day

In 2017, the tournament with the biggest prize fund in the history of Counter-Strike was held. At WESG, they offered a prize pool of $1.5 million. The lion’s share, $800 thousand, went to the French Team Envy.

Now, in 2019, a new competitive map based on Vertigo and the AUG meta have arrived in the game. Competition has escalated to impressive heights. The game has its own battle royale mode, and we also welcomed the retro version of Dust2 just yesterday. Let’s see what exciting changes will be coming our way by the end of the year!

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